Walter Trout Reveals New Song ‘All Out Of Tears’

Walter Trout returns with his brand new studio album ‘Ordinary Madness‘, which will be released on 28th August via Provogue. Ahead of this he has revealed another new song from the album., ‘All Out Of Tears‘.

Talking about the song he says; “In January, I was walking around at the International Blues Challenge in Memphis and ran into my friend (blues singer), Teeny Tucker. I asked her how she’s doing and she told me of recently losing her son, Boston. She said ‘my heart is crying but my eyes are dry. I guess I’ve just run out of tears to cry.’ I felt so bad for her and asked her if she’d like to write a song with me to honor her son’s memory using those words – and my wife and I worked with her to turn it into a song about the loss and grief one feels when losing a loved one.

For Walter Trout, there is no ‘us’ and ‘them’. Across his five-decade career, the great US bluesman’s music has always been a lifeline and call-to-arms, reminding listeners they are not alone. Now, as the world seeks solace from a tragedy that has touched us all, he comes armed with a boundary-exploring new studio album and eleven searingly honest songs that bring his fans even closer.

Admirably open about his troubled youth, and his own ongoing struggles with mental health, the bluesman had spent recent tours soothing himself by scribbling down his thoughts and feelings. It was only later he realised he’d just written the most honest lyric-sheet of his career – and felt he had an opportunity to let fans share and identify with him. “Everybody is dealing with something,” he says. “And I’m no different from anybody else. ‘Ordinary Madness‘ doesn’t mean you’re gonna end up in a mental institution. It’s just being human. It’s common humanity.

Trout convened his band of Michael Leasure (drums), Johnny Griparic (bass) and Teddy ‘Zig Zag’ Andreadis (keys) – along with long-time producer Eric Corne, plus special guests Skip Edwards, Drake ‘Munkihaid’ Shining and Anthony Grisham. The backdrop, once again, was the private LA studio of Doors legend Robby Krieger.  “The whole place is full of vintage gear, and it’s all there for you, whatever you want. The keyboard that Ray Manzarek used in The Doors – it’s just fucking sitting there. I remember, on the rhythm track for OK Boomer, Michael Dumas, who runs the studio, comes walking in and says: ‘Here’s the SG that Robby used in The Doors – wanna try this?’ Then, for the rhythm guitar on Heartland, he says: ‘Here’s one of James Burton’s Paisley Telecasters…‘”

Musically, Trout’s antennae are up, as he pushes the envelope on the psychedelic layered vocal harmonies of ‘The Sun Is Going Down‘, a song about dealing with ageing. Lyrically,he says, “it’s about running out of time. You gotta look at death, deal with it, accept it. That’s a condition of being alive.”  The blissed-out anthemics of ‘Up Above My Sky‘, nods to peak-period Pink Floyd and Trout worked with the US blues singer Teeny Tucker on the bereft ‘All Out Of Tears‘ – a tribute to her late son. On the haunting ‘Heaven In Your Eyes‘, Walter was stunned by Marie Trout‘s lyrics about the desperation of trying to find ways to reach the person you love but being unable to find the words.

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